Dysautonomia and Lyme Disease

Have you ever heard of Dysautonomia? Well, it is a general term used to describe a breakdown, or failure of the autonomic nervous system, which is a symptom of neurological Lyme disease.

Have you ever heard of Dysautonomia? Well, it is a general term used to describe a breakdown, or failure of the autonomic nervous system, which is a symptom of neurological Lyme disease.

The autonomic nervous system controls much of our involuntary functions such as breathing, blood pressure and temperature regulation. So symptoms of Dysautonomia are extremely wide ranging and can include problems with the regulation of heart rate, blood pressure,

body temperature and perspiration, fatigue, lightheadedness, feeling faint or actual fainting, weakness and cognitive impairment, or “brain fog”.

Sound familiar?

It is very important to understand this medical condition if you have Lyme disease because of the complications that can arise.

It is very important to understand this medical condition if you have Lyme disease because of the complications that can arise.

Autonomic dysfunction can occur as a secondary condition of

another disease, like diabetes, or as a primary disorder where the autonomic nervous system is the only system impacted.  These conditions are frequently misdiagnosed.

So, if you are suffering from Dysautonomia to begin with, any other infection such as Lyme disease, Bartonalla, Babesia or another tick-borne co-infection, not only will your symptoms become much worse, but your diagnosis could be even more difficult.

According to The National Dysautonomia Research Foundation, over one million

Americans are impacted with a primary autonomic system disorder. I believe that as research on Lyme disease continues that these numbers will climb, but for now, it is hard to prove due the difficulties diagnosing both diseases.

Some of the tests for Dysautonomia are the same ones you will need to take for Neurological Lyme disease. They include: Tilt Table Testing, actual imaging of nerves (for inflammation and/or abnormalities), experimenting with treatment protocols, and spinal taps.

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